How to Load a RSS feed into the Main Page of Self-hosted Installation

I have been working to update my websites by condensing them down and putting most into a WordPress shell. It’s been a challenge, because my blog Parallel Mind has a MailChimp mailing list, AND a following from WordPress (Twitter, Facebook).

So, I had decided to keep the blog and RSS feed it into my main site: ParallelMindzz.com. I have done this before with blogs, but to RSS feed a blog into the main page (the blog) of a WordPress self-hosted site is very challenging. I had to install 3 plugins and it still has issues. But I think I am getting closer to the end.

So, stay tuned. I want to offer some really fun, and exciting things once I am only updating two blogs/websites.

————

For those of you who are at wits end trying to save your established blog by feeding it into your WordPress self-hosted site, I hope my cribbed notes can help you, or at least point you in the right direction.

How to load an RSS feed in WP installation

Download and install into plugins folder (wp-content > plugins).
Use WordPress User Interface to do this automatically:

SimplePieCore
SimplePie
Exec-PHP

using Transit (FTP editor)
make a new folder called “cache” inside
wp-content folder
— cache

in WordPress interface:
Users > Your Profile
turn off WYSIWYG editor (on breaks the code)

Make a new page called “Blog”
paste the PHP code directly into the article. Example:

<!–?php echo SimplePieWP(‘http://parallelmind.wordpress.com/feed/&#8217;); ?>

To make the new Blog page show on the “index” page:

Settings > Reading

Change front page displays to “blog”

——-the following is from the Exec-PHP plugin documentation (see in WP app)——

http://www.parallelmindzz.com/dev/wp-content/plugins/exec-php/docs/readme.html#tag_balancing

————-

WordPress’ XHTML tag balancing
Depending on your PHP code it may be necessary to turn off WordPress’ built in XHTML tag balancing if the code is written in the content of an article. This can be done through the setting ‘WordPress should correct invalidly nested XHTML automatically’ on the ‘Settings > Write’ menu in WordPress. If in question, better turn this option off. An alternative to turning this option off may be to install the Mime Type Plugin and use the mime type text/html individually on each article that contains PHP.
Writing PHP code with the WYSIWYG editor

To successfully write PHP code in the content of an article, the WYSIWYG editor needs to be turned off through the ‘Users > Your Profile’ menu. It is not enough to simply keep the WYSIWYG editor on, switch to the ‘Code’ tab of the editor in the ‘Write’ menu and save the article. This will render all contained PHP code permanently unuseful.

Instead of turining off the WYSIWYG editor in your user profile you can temporarily disable it for certain articles by using the Deactivate Visual Editor plugin. I haven’t tested it but it sounds like a reasonable solution for you guys that like to use the WYSIWYG editor.

If you still are in need of writing PHP code with the TinyMCE WYSIWYG editor, you may want to experiment with some TinyMCE plugins that may allow to write PHP code. Such experiments are outside of the scope of this plugin. From my point of view there is a general requirements conflict when you are in need of writing PHP code with any kind of WYSIWYG editor. Therefore it is not planned to natively support writing PHP code in the WYSIWYG editor for any upcoming release of the Exec-PHP plugin.
Allowing PHP code to be written in articles

Before executing PHP code, the user needs to write it first. 😉 A user may experience problems in writing PHP code in the content of an article, because in the way that WordPress will rewrite the code (and therefore will break it for later execution) during saving the article. This is because the user also needs the ‘unfiltered_html’ capability assigned to.

Assigning capabilities to roles or users is out of the scope of this plugin. Because WordPress has no built-in configuration menu in the admin menu to assign roles/capabilities, you need to install one of the available role/capability manager plugins as the one mentioned in the requirements.

Allowing PHP code execution in articles

After installation, execution of PHP code is limited to the Administrator role by default. By assigning the ‘exec_php’ capability to another role or user will allow them to execute PHP code in their posts.
Assigning capabilities to roles or users is out of the scope of this plugin. Because WordPress has no built-in configuration menu in the admin menu to assign roles/capabilities, you need to install one of the available role/capability manager plugins as the one mentioned in the requirements.
Allowing PHP code in text widgets

By default execution of PHP code in widgets is activated. Any user who has the ‘switch_themes’ capability can write and execute PHP code in text widgets. Because this may be a security issue, you may want to disable PHP code execution in widgets through the plugin configuration menu.
WordPress’ XHTML tag balancing

Depending on your PHP code it may be necessary to turn off WordPress’ built in XHTML tag balancing if the code is written in the content of an article. This can be done through the setting ‘WordPress should correct invalidly nested XHTML automatically’ on the ‘Settings > Write’ menu in WordPress. If in question, better turn this option off. An alternative to turning this option off may be to install the Mime Type Plugin and use the mime type text/html individually on each article that contains PHP.
Writing PHP code with the WYSIWYG editor

To successfully write PHP code in the content of an article, the WYSIWYG editor needs to be turned off through the ‘Users > Your Profile’ menu. It is not enough to simply keep the WYSIWYG editor on, switch to the ‘Code’ tab of the editor in the ‘Write’ menu and save the article. This will render all contained PHP code permanently unuseful.

Instead of turining off the WYSIWYG editor in your user profile you can temporarily disable it for certain articles by using the Deactivate Visual Editor plugin. I haven’t tested it but it sounds like a reasonable solution for you guys that like to use the WYSIWYG editor.

If you still are in need of writing PHP code with the TinyMCE WYSIWYG editor, you may want to experiment with some TinyMCE plugins that may allow to write PHP code. Such experiments are outside of the scope of this plugin. From my point of view there is a general requirements conflict when you are in need of writing PHP code with any kind of WYSIWYG editor. Therefore it is not planned to natively support writing PHP code in the WYSIWYG editor for any upcoming release of the Exec-PHP plugin.
Allowing PHP code to be written in articles

Before executing PHP code, the user needs to write it first. 😉 A user may experience problems in writing PHP code in the content of an article, because in the way that WordPress will rewrite the code (and therefore will break it for later execution) during saving the article. This is because the user also needs the ‘unfiltered_html’ capability assigned to.
Assigning capabilities to roles or users is out of the scope of this plugin. Because WordPress has no built-in configuration menu in the admin menu to assign roles/capabilities, you need to install one of the available role/capability manager plugins as the one mentioned in the requirements.
Allowing PHP code execution in articles

After installation, execution of PHP code is limited to the Administrator role by default. By assigning the ‘exec_php’ capability to another role or user will allow them to execute PHP code in their posts.
Assigning capabilities to roles or users is out of the scope of this plugin. Because WordPress has no built-in configuration menu in the admin menu to assign roles/capabilities, you need to install one of the available role/capability manager plugins as the one mentioned in the requirements.
Allowing PHP code in text widgets

By default execution of PHP code in widgets is activated. Any user who has the ‘switch_themes’ capability can write and execute PHP code in text widgets. Because this may be a security issue, you may want to disable PHP code execution in widgets through the plugin configuration menu.

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